DSC_9987.jpg
DSC_7275.jpg
DSC_7497.jpg
DSC_9987.jpg

Puppies


Irish Wolfhound Puppies for sale from Heart Tested Parents

SCROLL DOWN

Puppies


Irish Wolfhound Puppies for sale from Heart Tested Parents

"Irish Wolfhounds  are such an addictive breed with their soulful eyes and knowing looks".

Our hounds are our hobby, but there is nothing amateur about our approach.   Standards  are high, with emphasis on health, heart health, longevity  and their emotional wellbeing.   Having a keen eye is very important, as we strive to improve the breed, and there is nothing more pleasurable than watching healthy balanced hounds exercise, their speed, alertness, and movement is a sight to behold.  

 I am grateful of  the on going help and support of many other long established  reputable Irish Wolfhound breeders in the UK,  without this mentoring I would not have been able to breed and have such lovely hounds.   I would also like to thank  Jürgen, who I came to know because the Oelmühle Kennel name was on the pedigree of my first Irish Wolfhound.  

These days we very rarely advertise our  Wolfhounds puppies. Our litters arrive when our girls are ready, which means waiting for a series of heart test results,  and for the girls  to mature. We also heart match our matings, in an attempt to achieve the best possible heart health outcome.   

Whelping and  rearing of all our Bonaforte Irish Wolfhound puppies takes place in the home environment  (Bonaforte's Any Old Eva)

All our puppies are born in our home, and there they stay until their new owners arrive. Having the benefit of the complete home experience whilst growing up, we are constantly with them for the first 3 weeks of their life.  In addition we feel is it very important, that puppies regularly  go outside not only to play and exercise but to house train them as much as we can. 

DSC_7275.jpg

Do's & Don't


The Irish Wolfhound Centre

Do's & Don't


The Irish Wolfhound Centre

I would say the most difficult thing about raising an Irish Wolfhound is keeping them safe from their own exuberance. This seems a particularly hard message to convey to new owners, that such care should be taken for the first year during the growing process.  You need to perfect the careful balance of nutrition and exercise to protect them.

The Big DO’s and DON’Ts Sheet

Whilst being the proud owner of a Wolfhound puppy is a huge delight it also brings with it a large responsibility, as you are now in charge of rearing the puppy until it fully develops and reaches adulthood. This sheet is designed to guide you through the main pitfalls of bringing up a giant breed puppy and if you follow these simple steps any disasters should be kept to a minimum!

DO:

  •  Do feed your puppy on a healthy balanced diet.  We advise you feed our Salmon & Potato kibble.  As poor nutrition or over feeding can lead to problems.  
  •  Do allow your puppy free exercise in a secure area preferably on grass every day. Although giant breed puppies have fragile bones and joints they do require some exercise to build up muscle tone and stamina and so a run around on the lawn with their owner keeping an eye on them is important.
  • Do provide a safe and secure place for puppy to rest, away from other dogs or children.  
  • Do take your puppy out to meet people and other dogs once it has been fully vaccinated. Socialising your puppy is very important and any dog needs to get used to new places and experiences such as going in the car to visits friends and family or going to the park to meet other dogs

DON’T:

  •  Don’t over exercise your puppy under any circumstances. Usually Wolfhound puppies are not walked until they are 6 months old and then they are built up gradually, initially only walking for 5 minutes. Despite their size, Wolfhound puppies are very delicate and their growing bones and joints need to be treated with great care. Any mistakes in exercise and over exuberance under a year old can affect the puppy for the rest of its life.
  • Don’t let your puppy walk on slippy surfaces such as tiles, laminate flooring, wood flooring or cushion flooring/lino. Slippy floors are responsible for a huge amount of injuries in both puppies and older dogs of all breeds, but giant breed puppies are particularly susceptible to mishaps. They will slide on these slippy surfaces and hurt their legs and other parts of their body. Some of these injuries can have disastrous consequences. 
  • Don’t let your puppy play with other dogs unsupervised, even if they are your dogs and they are playing at home. Generally it is recommended that a Wolfhound puppy does not play with older/larger dogs until it is at least a year old. Again, letting your puppy run riot with other dogs is likely to end up with the puppy being hurt or injured. 
  • Don’t let your puppy walk up and down stairs, and prevent them from jumping out of cars.  Keep impact on all joints to a minimum, even getting on and off sofa's in an exuberant manner may harm. 
  • Don't let puppy run over rough ground and fields.  These areas can be fraught with pot holes and hidden obstacles which may cause puppy to stumble and tumble and hurt those long fragile limbs. 
There are many reasons why you should be careful not to allow the young puppy too much exercise or free running around.
Some are:
1. He will run his food off, too much adrenalin using up energy and food value and may not develop properly
2. He can cause trauma damage to his bones, OCD (Osteochondrosis - a chip off the cartilage, and also known as footballer’s knee) is a danger to large and giant breeds, and one of the causes is too much exercise which can result in accidental damage (trauma).
3. It can also cause the front feet to point east and west instead of straight forward, (incorrect feeding can also contribute to this), although too much running around seems to be the main contributory factor.
4. Do not take him for long walks, or road walking which we call pavement pounding; this will ruin him and his legs. This type of exercise can come later when he is fully grown.”
— The Irish Wolfhound Health Group Guide

   


DSC_7497.jpg

Irish Wolfhound Puppies


The Irish Wolfhound Centre

Irish Wolfhound Puppies


The Irish Wolfhound Centre

                                                                                                              

                                                                                                              

  If you are reading this you are thinking of living with a large hunting hound, please think carefully, it is really important you do your homework when contemplating sharing your life with an Irish Wolfhound

  Information about our Irish Wolfhound Puppies

  1. All our Irish Wolfhound pups are liver shunt tested, and to date have passed with low results. The shunt test certificate will be found in our puppy pack. 
  2. All the hounds are heart tested every six months. Our puppies  will be from parents who are heart tested regularly and cleared for breeding by a Veterinary Cardiologist.  Copies of the heart test certificates for both parents are always included in the puppy pack.
  3. All our Irish Wolfhound puppies are vet checked: heart, lungs, mouth, eyes, rear hind flection test and general health check, in accordance with the Assured Breeder Scheme.  The vaccination card is also included in your puppy pack along with results from the health check. 
  4. All our puppies are mirco-chipped 
  5. All our puppies are vaccinated
  6. Our puppies parents are heart tested every 6 months, parents are DNA tested and mating hounds are heart matched. 
  7. Our Irish Wolfhound puppies are Kennel Club Registered.
  8. All our puppies leave with 4 weeks free insurance
  9. All puppies are sold with endorsements (see blog for more details on endorsements).
  10. All documents accompany your new puppy plus a supply of My Beloved Wolfhound Salmon & Potato kibble. 
  11.  We also offer a free heart testing service once your hound reaches the age of 24 months.  It is very important for the Kennel and the breed that we keep tract of the future heart health of our puppies.
  12. In addition we make a donation with every puppy sale to further Irish Wolfhound Heart  research.  
  13. Most importantly of all, our puppies are born and raised in a home environment.  Socialisation and handling plays a large and important part of our rearing techniques, giving our puppies the best possible foundation we can, and we take time off from our work to ensure this happens.   Our puppies are use to the vacuum cleaner, washing machine, dishwasher, TV and radio, the general clatter and commotion of the home. We expose them to as many different sounds and experiences as possible, and keen to introduce them to as many floor surfaces as possible too. 
  14. How much is an Irish Wolfhound Puppy?  Starting at £1,750 to purchase and on average including insurance, an Irish Wolfhound will cost you anywhere between £65 and £100 per month to keep.  In addition they are certainly not the easiest breed to own;  they are very sensitive creatures,  so finding them the right environment for their needs is crucial.  You will need to do your homework and listen to your breeder please. Despite their size Irish Wolfhound puppies are very easy to injure when young and growing.  They grow like weeds and their own exuberance can be their undoing, with their fragile gangly legs, too much bounding around, carrying too much weight and playing with older dogs can cause untold damage, misery, and vets bills.     
  15. Still thinking about owning an Irish Wolfhound Puppy?  Click here and take a look at Paws for Reflection  

    Taking your Irish Wolfhound Puppy home soon ?  Take a look at our Puppy check List

Liver Shunt Test


The Irish Wolfhound Centre

Liver Shunt Test


The Irish Wolfhound Centre

Irish Wolfhound Liver Shunt Testing.

What is a Liver Shunt?

Liver shunts cause serious and sometimes fatal outcomes in dogs. A liver shunt, or a portosystemic shunt, is a normal fetal blood vessel that in the womb bypasses liver tissue, allowing the mother’s system to filter out toxins for the developing puppy. In some animals, however, the shunt remains open after the animal is born, compromising its liver function, slowing growth, and eventually resulting in death of many affected animals.

What are bile acids?
Bile acids are produced in the liver and stored in the gallbladder between meals. They are released into the intestines to help break down and absorb fats, and are reabsorbed and stored again until they are needed. Dogs with liver shunts have increased blood bile acid concentrations because the liver does not get a chance to remove and store these chemicals after they are reabsorbed.

So please when buying your puppy ask to see his or her liver shunt certificate, and enquire if that certificate is included in your puppy pack,  because it should be. At no extra cost to the breeder either.  Check the microchip number against your puppy’s number.  This can be found in the centre column underneath the Idexx name.  See Test Report for one of my puppies.  It still happens that breeders don’t test, or say they have tested, and haven’t, for whatever reason.  If breeding It is also in advisable to use any dog which has had liver shunt, so check that both parents tested clear too. 

More very useful information can be found here: 

 

 http://www.iwhealthgroup.co.uk/pss.html



Wolfhound Experience


The Irish Wolfhound Centre

Wolfhound Experience


The Irish Wolfhound Centre